Women who have had gestational diabetes

Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. Up to 60% of women who have gestational diabetes will go on to develop type 2 diabetes[1][2]Type 2 diabetes can be prevented, so it is important to take steps to reduce your risk.

1. Register for the Life! program – Women who have had gestational diabetes are eligible for the Life! helping you prevent diabetes, heart disease & stroke program. This healthy lifestyle program is run by health professionals who can help you learn more about nutrition, physical activity, sleep, stress and staying on track. Call 13 RISK (13 74 75) or email life@diabetesvic.org.au to find out more and to enrol.

2. Maintain a healthy weight - Being overweight or obese can increase your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, particularly if the weight is stored around your waist. To learn how to measure your waist click here

3. Eat healthy foods - Eat a wide variety of nutritious foods from the five food groups every day and drink plenty of water.

4. Be physically active - Try to be active on most, preferably all, days of the week. Research has shown that just 30 minutes of moderate activity a day has many health benefits. Visit our blog for tips to sneak more exercise into your day.

5. Ask your GP for a diabetes risk check-up. The frequency of your check-ups will depend on your individual situation; however, if you are planning another pregnancy you should have an oral glucose tolerance test every year.[3]

Research suggests that gestational diabetes may increase a child’s risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes later in life[4]so it’s important to encourage the whole family to lead a healthy life too. You can find more information on healthy living at Better Health Channel’s Healthy Living Section.

 

 


[1] Buchanan, Thomas A., Anny H. Xiang, and Kathleen A. Page. “Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: Risks and Management during and after Pregnancy.” Nature reviews. Endocrinology 8.11 (2012): 639–649. PMC. Web. 10 Apr. 2018.

[2]Noctor, Eoin, and Fidelma P Dunne. “Type 2 Diabetes after Gestational Diabetes: The Influence of Changing Diagnostic Criteria.” World Journal of Diabetes 6.2 (2015): 234–244. PMC. Web. 10 Apr. 2018.

[3] https://www.racgp.org.au/your-practice/guidelines/diabetes/13-diabetes-and-reproductive-health/133-gestational-diabetes-mellitus#255

[4] Damm, P., Houshmand-Oeregaard, A., Kelstrup, L. et al. Diabetologia (2016) 59: 1396. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00125-016-3985-5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


[1] Buchanan, Thomas A., Anny H. Xiang, and Kathleen A. Page. “Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: Risks and Management during and after Pregnancy.” Nature reviews. Endocrinology 8.11 (2012): 639–649. PMC. Web. 10 Apr. 2018.
[2]Noctor, Eoin, and Fidelma P Dunne. “Type 2 Diabetes after Gestational Diabetes: The Influence of Changing Diagnostic Criteria.” World Journal of Diabetes 6.2 (2015): 234–244. PMC. Web. 10 Apr. 2018.
[3] https://www.racgp.org.au/your-practice/guidelines/diabetes/13-diabetes-and-reproductive-health/133-gestational-diabetes-mellitus#255
[4] Damm, P., Houshmand-Oeregaard, A., Kelstrup, L. et al. Diabetologia (2016) 59: 1396. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00125-016-3985-5